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How to write good networking emails

Writing “Remember me?” or even, “You probably don’t remember me…” will not cut it in networking emails to someone you barely know, reports The Daily Muse. While you’re coming from a sincere place, it’s pretty daring to ask someone for help or advice whom you barely know.

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Picture: GianlucaCiroTancredi / fotolia.com

So skip the line saying “we are strangers” and instead find a point of connection, for example the occasion where you met. Refer to an event where you had a conversation, exchanged business cards or connected on LinkedIn. Try to sound like you would sound had you met this person again face to face, remembering where you connected first. For example you could write:

“Hello Emma, we met at last year's so-and-so conference in Blommesville, where we found out that we had just gone off sugar. I only lasted for two weeks, though. I am reaching out, because.... thank you, Jane. “

If you try to reconnect with somebody to whom you have lost contact, there probably is a reason why. Again: “Remember me?” is not going to get you anywhere since you basically remind your old acquaintance that you have not bothered to stay in touch. Instead surf the net, research the current state of the other person's affairs and then refer to them. For example:  “Hi John. I see from LinkedIn / Facebook / Twitter that you are working in the xxx sector now. Congratulations! I have been pondering to move into this field myself and was wondering if you have time for a cup of coffee / drink / phone call to catch up and discuss. All the best, James.”

If you are addressing somebody important or even famous, don't feel star-struck. True, they may speak to a lot of people and therefore need context to realise who you are, but otherwise write to them like you would address any other business contacts. Such as: “Hello Bruce, it was great to catch up at the so-and-so meeting. Your speech was interesting and I particularly enjoyed the such-and-such point you made about this-and-that. Merry Christmas and I look forward to meeting you again in the New Year at the annual meeting / event / gala / conference. Sincerely, Rajit.”

If you barely know somebody or lost touch you will have to put some extra thought into a networking email. Still, there is no need to lead with the remark that you barely know each other that it has been a while. Instead, be thoughtful, brief and to the point.

Read more at the Muse

 

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